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getting a medallion is the pinnacle of driving a job and right now there are hundreds of us at the peak and you deny us and take for yourself. this can't be right. you can't be serious. how can you ignore the plight of hundreds of cab drivers who have worked a lifetime, altered their lives and sacrificed and refused other opportunity in order to earn their medallion. it's so wrong and cruel. you have stolen my future and my family's future. in case you're not aware of it cabbies have families too. right now i suffer from terment of this justice and it's severe and the first thing i think of in the morning and last thing at night. it's the epitome of being used and abused. prop k kept us in this business with promises and hope and so did prop a by the way at the start, and i looked at this as security for my family and pension and retirement plan and now i'm looking at nothing, a complete dead end. this is a shame, and there's an sf little pamphlet that these guys put out in march of 09 and promised to get to everybody on that list, so they chipped away and chipped awa
they have done great work with us. i want to extend my appreciation to them. big hand forclw, please. [ applause ] and of course, where is dennis oats? this guy is going to be here everyday making sure that the project is done well and built to spec. dennis oats, please let everybody know and if you have questions about this library, that is the man to talk to, dennis oats. [ applause ] >> lastly, i wanted to especially thank luis and his staff. luis in so many meetings had the opportunity to change the course or do something different and he stuck there all the way. he continued to encourage us. this is what i want. we need to get it and all the battles that we went through, luis was there and made good, sound decisions along with the library commission and that is why we're here today with that great project. big hand for luis and his leadership and the library. [ applause ] and of course, the project will be a library and a park and we need to do more projects like that in san francisco. so joining everybody, i'm looking forward to this groundbreaking and i'm looking forward to
will be available electronically, that means sort of in its raw form for the public to use? >> exactly. >> i think it would be great at that time to have some sort of public training. my guess is a lot of people are really interested in neighborhood scale data. so, looking at the map, some of the data is -- you have the boundaries quite large. so, to look -- to help them figure out how to use that to sort of answer the questions people in neighborhoods are looking for. >> okay, yeah. definitely. >> commissioner antonini. >> a couple things i read in a little more depth through most of this. one thing that seemed a little curious to me is a category private household employees, and that number increased a lot from 2002 to 2011. i'm not sure how these are really being categorized. there are many instances where in a private home you'll employ someone often as an outside contractor, like a gardner and he or she will do a number of different jobs in a given day. they will have many different employers, of course. i'm not quite sure how that does -- those figures are compiled. also in similar ways, peo
can come with me we will use black. >> we had a lot of changes in the graffiti unit. we do private property if someone moved we remove it and send it to the attorney's office and they take appropriate action. >> damage their property there. it's important to write the color in case they want to say what part of our house you abated the graffiti on. >> using your safety glasses the gloves. >> you got it. >> you know some places we gashi, people appreciate that. you know, a lot of timeses they say, thank you. >> the time where it's visible. a lot of people put it on the ground. >> i like when tourists come and say, you do this for your city and you get paid for that? >> we use the [inaudible] for the holes and the retaining walls. [inaudible]. white on the fire hydrants. fire box red for the fire boxes. our brown for the pg and e poles. >> we are not painters we do our best. >> i'm assuming it has to do with gang activity. >> if it's territorial i mind. >> in case it's gang related and they are marking our territory i would like to paint it over. >> anything with numbers
important things people could be talking about now. for all of us, technology is here and going to be here, and we all need it. thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. thank you. i am really pleased to be up here -- well, not really, but you're so pleased to be able to tell you about two things before lunch -- i am pleased to be able to tell you about two things before lunch. as you know, this is the middle of a process to train and teach more people how to use computers. we wanted to showcase a little bit of what folks are learning out there. first, we will show a video, and then wind up -- linda will explain about lunch. i know a few people have slipped over there, but i ask everyone to be quiet for a few minutes. there is plenty to go around. the video we're going to show right now -- i got a feeling this morning at 4:00 a.m. that tells you how dedicated people were to be able to produce it and have it here today. i wanted to thank paul grant, who has worked with the project with the family services agency senior community services employment program. you will see his g
to be completed. a lot of hard decisions and he stood with us. phil ginsburg, rec and park director. our dpw director mohammed, the last time i saw o & m mohammed he was pushing a wheelbarrow. our department heads have stood with us. jill, karen, besides them, gary, who was at the time capital planning manager for rec and park. mindy, lenu chen, the manager for the project. michael from planning, john from the city attorney's office. michelle and mary, michelle is with the library and mary is with the friends of the library and put on this event today. our commissioners, rec and park, planning, library, who have voted unanimously. some of them more than once for this project. our board of supervisors, who stood with us. the architects, marsha and a special thanks to erin who has done so much to help us on though this project. you know? that is the city side of this public-private partnership and i have to be fair in saying that this project has lasted through the term of two supervisors, two head librarians, three mayors, and four rec and park general managers. the heart of this project, t
the mission. this would allow those limited corner commercial uses to expand and it would only apply in the mission district. we currently, on your recommendation, made those changes in rm-3 districts and rm-4 and it extended to the rto. it passed this week on final reading. the only item up for first reading is an amendment to the administrative code for the port prepayment of the jobs housing linkage fee. this ordinance was not before you, but you instead requested a memo. the ordinance is sponsored by supervisor kim. and it would allow prepayment of that fee when the port makes lands available at less than market rate to the mayor's office of housing. and this week that item passed first reading. the only introduction was the landmarking of the castro street twin peaks tavern, and it was sponsored by the [speaker not understood] preservation commission. that concludes my report. the zoning administrator did pass along his report to me from the board of appeals. there were two items that he wanted you to know about. the first was an appeal of the zoning administrator letter o
we could lessen our carbon footprint and talk about better energy use. that's perfect for us. that's what we're going to ask this challenge to present for our next improve sf challenge for the city. and that's what we'd like to engage people in. and then hopefully, some time after this challenge is announced, and if we can get the best ideas out there, we will be engaged with you to select the best answer. and if there's an idea out there that can answer that question about how to inspire people, then hopefully wq can go into november a hack-athon sponsored by green biz and others to develop an app that everyone can use. that's a great challenge. that's going to be so worthy of contributing to a goal that we've had about reducing our carbon footprint as a city. it's not just the households. once we get that data out we could look at the data from a community.re level and look at e data from a citywide level to see what we can do. i'm encouraged by that. i didn't want to give my data up to pg&e for various reasons. now iú] want to give it up for this challenge because i know people
were in, we felt safe and comfortable there. and i feel like my father, he wanted us to have an education. he knew that education was the key to a better life, but i really think he got -- he thought all of us would come right back home and try to work from there. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. .. this interview as part of book tv college series, about 20 minutes. >> and your watching book tv on c-span2. one of the things we do is visit campuses around the country. it gives us a chance to talk with professors who are also authors, and today we are at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis to maryland. joining us is the author of this book, michael skerker, an ethics of interrogation is the name of the book published by the university of chicago press. professor, first of all, what do you do at the naval academy? >> i am an ethicist. to see at this glass that all the answers have to take in some upper levels las, religiousyy studies and that they courses. >> would you say your book is a philosophical book or a how to interrogate book? >> it is
heard about the conflict between the storage and maintenance needs, and the use by thousands of travelers and of course right there with residential neighborhood, so the upper yard which is our satellite light rail storage yard historically is now recently it's been used for employee parking and that is in the red outline. we are looking at how to make that available for conversion to a transit village probably along with the bart kiss and ride roadway way to the west and that is in line with the balboa park station area plan that the board of supervisors adopted that calls for reusing that site as a transit village with affordable housing being a high priority, maybe support retail. a lot of potential benefits for example in increasing the transit rider ship and the station capacity study looked at the transportation feasibility of that, and found that it would work well from the transportation standpoint. there have been a number of other studies under way in terms of the potential land uses. i'm not going to get into that. it is a challenge for the sf mta to meet the ne
community. without this legislation, the planning code would not allow us to build a new hospital, right here on this site. it is our dream to have something to continue on for our future. but now, our dream is becoming a reality. i would like to bring up the one supporter, the friend, who helped us, the organization and the project, the mayor of san francisco ed lee. [ applause ] >> thank you, brend brenda. good morning, everyone, welcome to the chinese center, where the hospital has been since the late 1800s. this is history for all of us. it is history for our city. and those of you who know about that history, know that chinese hospice was built in a time when immigrants came here and faced discrimination. they faced a whole lot of barriers. they couldn't buy property. they couldn't get healthcare to people that were working in the gold mines and on the rail roads. and this is something that many generations of immigrants to come to this country have learned about, even in a wonderful city, and ininclusive city like san francisco. so it is in the backdrop that all of us have come tog
and things that can reduce water use in san francisco. can you tell us a little bit about that? she is a toilet expert, by the way. >> toilets have all different flows, but carli, you have to have a 1.6 gallon or less. -- currently. >> that is the state plumbing code minimum standard. >> that is going to save your water compared to what a lot of people still have in their bathrooms. they have 3.5 or 5 gallons. that is using a ton of water. >> the year there is a new city ordinance requirement to reduce flow flesh? >> and a lot of manufacturers are real -- are already making those toilets. right here, we have a dual-flush toilet. this toilet uses 1.6 gallons on the full flush and 0.9 on the half less. >> what happened? >> it automatically opens. this is a fancy toilet. we can get to that later. >> this is the half loss, which is how many? >> 0.9. so it is very good toilet, water-saving. and then the other kind of toilet that saves water is and 1.28 gallons a flush. >> i know when people first started selling and installing the 1.6, there were problems with it was not clear in the bow
the data and they have to make this stuff available in the way that we collect it, and use it and public information should remain public and we are going to drive that forward. >> there are a lot of things in the strategy around and the use of mobile government and how we summarize the... and think about the 21st century government in that way. and the policy that launched a couple of weeks ago and so much more is being formed that i think will be very transformational in the years to come. >> wh, digital gov in the document, the digital updates, if you are like me you can experience it in a twitter boot strap format. and you can go through that, and i encourage you to not only download it, you know, and pay attention to what was going on and start using the data and start using... available and more importantly think about what are the next level? what is the next gps? how can we foster that? and then give that to us. you know, connecting on twitter, follow up on the... (inaudible) sector and today and just let us know. you know, it is actually going to come from here, the government n
microwave, what about -- i was told before that you could use plastic for the refrigerator or storage, are you saying avoid plastics all together for food storage, and then the second question is water bottles, say for instance i have a case of like costco water in my trunk that i just keep, is it the heat that's leeching stuff into the water or is the sun breaking down the plastic, what is getting leaked into the water, is it the bpa or other toxins? >> these are great questions and they're kind of the same answer in a way. heat and light can both make plastic break down, either alone or in connection, i lived for a long time in arizona that if you leave your water in the car, it's cooking and getting exposed to light, but either one of those can lead chemicals to leak into the plastic, with bpa, we know, for instance, that it's hundreds of times more is leaked in with high heat than with low heat, it's just the nature of plastics. but the chemicals in most food contacts like that and your water bottles are usually a number 1, the main chemical in most of those is usuall
, and it has carried us to our destination. have you ever wondered how elevators were -- work? we check out the need outside the elevator using current technology and we learn about the latest destination elevated technology all here in san francisco. we will also visit the machinery where all the behind- the-scenes gears control these incredible machines. we are very fortunate today to have an expert with those who is going to walk us are around elevators in san francisco. can you tell us about the history of elevators in san francisco? the measure -- >> sure. the history of elevator technology evolves with the city. first elevators were installed for moving materials in the 1860's. in the 1870's, the first passenger elevator was installed, and that allowed building heights to go up to about seven floors. starting in the 18 eighties, 1890's, the first electric elevators were installed. that allowed for buildings to go up even higher, even more than 10 floors, and those were the first elevators that became representative of what we consider modern elevators today. >> so the height of buildi
presentation on a number of considerations to be taken into account in the plan. they asked us to come and let you know what we are doing together input and ask for your participation because we are trying to gather as much input from folks all over the city as possible. i'm going to - go through a couple of slides here. just to give you some background. the san francisco transportation plan does a few things. it is a long-range, citywide planning effort, looking from now until 2040, just under 30 years, at all of the transportation funding. and try to prioritize between different needs that we have. and balance those needs and prioritize funding accordingly. we are also looking at different things that we can do is additionally and with policy to try to meet more of those needs. with the system we have now. and the investments that we can make moving forward. we will also develop two different plan scenarios. one is a fiscally constrained scenario, looking specifically at the funding that we will have over that plan period and what we can do without. also looking at a vision
the legal battle and you all stood with us and we're here today to break ground on this great library, big hand for all of those who put that effort in. [ applause ] this project is the 24th library that our agency has been involved in. we have renovated 16 libraries, and we have built 6 new ones. the 23rd is in the bayview in my neighborhood and that will be ready for groundbreaking in january and for completion and opening in january and now we're groundbreaking on this project. as part of this project, you will be getting a two-story library. it will be designed for led silver or greater and sustainable and as opposed to the old library it will be ready for the big one, seismically fit. something mayor lee has put forth in his leadership as mayor is that it will bring a lot of jobs and this library will be the first library to undergo the new local hiring law, meaning that 25% of san franciscans will be working on this project. big hand for mayor lee and the board of supervisors for their leadership u. [ applause ] i would like to thank our management team, edgar lopez under his directi
us demonstrate the things we talked about when pursuing them, local hire, jobs for people, vendors respective of our small businesses, a waterfront design sensitive to the views and the environment that we want to have, and a great, great addition to our economy in the city for years and years to come, so it is with great pride that we make this announcement because many of the people in this room are looking for that opportunity from all walks of life, from every community in san francisco they see this as a city wide projected, not just on the waterfront. it's everybody's future. everybody has to be heard and i know that even this weekend there was a telephonic ability to talk to people online and the telephone. there were over 4,000 people that engaged themselves with a conversation and the warriors and about what this project meant. it's incredible. i also want to give a shout out to the port and i know monique is here and they're working hard with our team and continuing this ongoing dialogue and we will have more announcements to make. right now this is just the beginni
difficult, the u.s. has no diplomatic relationship with hamas. a group it labels a terrorist organization. so egyptian president mohammed morsi is playing a key role as intermediary. >> the critical challenge is going to be to make sure that everybody understands the commitments that have been made, the same way, so there's no misunderstandings. >> reporter: even with diplomacy in high gear, today was one of the st violence days yet. an israeli soldier was killed. the first since the conflict began. 150 incoming rockets, 30 alone aimed at a southern town. did you run down the stairs? >> yes. >> reporter: this family narrowly escaped a direct hit on their house. how many people were in the house at the time? >> six people. >> reporter: six people? >> i, my wife and four children. >> just in the last week -- >> reporter: the israeli government says their goal is to stop rocket attacks like this for good. >> we don't think any country in the world would deal with such a situation. >> reporter: near the border, israeli soldiers still wait anxiously for an order to inv e invade. >> we're abou
representative residentr lives. philip came to the u.s. from hong kong when he was a teenager. he attended george washington high school and worked as a youth counselor for the mayor's office summer youth program. he was a vista volunteer with the california youth authority before joining the san francisco housing authority?hp$k in '78. he holds a banc bachelor's degre from san francisco state university. he's a member of board of directors for self-help of the elderly. pamela, earned a injuries doctor and a public law certificate from the university of san francisco school of law and became a member of the state bar of california in 2010. she chaired the student bar association diversity committee, nationally recognized with the american bar association henry j. ramsey jr. award towards advancement of diverse individuals. pamela also earned a bachelor of arts at the university of california at davis. leland reuben was born and raised in san francisco, where he first developed a strong passion for working with l÷pápñ community. he currently oversees the intensative job readiness and works with
for this project. this hearing again gives us the opportunity to hear about one of the two top issues of concerns for constituents in the south beach rincon hill and mission bay neighborhood. the first that we occurred was transportation. this area is already a neighborhood that is quite impacted by the regular traffic of workers and commuters onto the bay bridge as well as the 2 80. we have a lot of questions in terms of what this new arena -- what is really the assessed impact that we believe might occur and what types of investments do we as a city need to make to address the demands. we have some of the highest collisions between pedestrians and vehicleses in the south of market. so, how will this project impact those rates? second, we asked questions whether we can support bike infrastructure in that neighborhood to increase bike circulation so folks can bike to and [speaker not understood]. third, we have questions about what public transit investment costs are and to meet the demands of additional gains in this neighborhood. we've already seen what muni has been able to do with giants home
supportive and helpful in helping all of us move to this process. i just had a couple final points. first of all, you know, i think we all -- a lot of people have it in our heads we would love for everyone to live in a single-family home or some really big spacious flat. and unfortunately that's not the reality of 2012 san francisco. very few people who are not fortunate enough to have bought or rented a large place a long time ago can afford to do that. it's just not an economic reality in san francisco and we need to be housing everyone, not just the people who are lucky enough to be able to afford or to have spent a long time living in a reasonably priced large unit. we also, as much as we all support public investment in affordable housing -- and i was a big proponent of proposition c, we're never going to have enough public affordable housing money to solve our housing affordability problem just through public investment. part of the solution, it will never be the entire solution, we have to be flexible and creative. and i also want to address i think a fallacy that's out there that
limiting use like in your car, get some stainless steel or aluminum water bottles, fill those with the water and you can leaf -- leave those in the car, you can have three or four so they're go and grab ready, plastics in the refrigerator, it's a personal decision, but sometimes i'll store stuff in plastic myself, but i kind of switched over to almost only glass just because it's easier to have one set of stuff ultimately. >> [inaudible]. >> obviously i'm not leaving it in there for months but i might leave a case in there, i might have that for a couple of weeks. >> studies they've done have usually been 72 to 108 hours, so relatively short-term, but also somewhat higher heat exposure than what we probably get most of the time in san francisco, so conditions are really variable and then it's usually controlled rather than kind of normal. yeah? >> so, in general where possible, staying away from plastic water bottles is not only making your life a little bit healthier, it's decreasing our dependence on plastic which is more important as a broader environmental issue, but even
and low on options with that neighborhood. central to their concern is that while a new entertainment uses are permitted in the proposed plan south of harrison it fails to adequately support the viability of the area for the future entertainment of western soma. the citizen status as legal non conforming uses and continuation in the plan effectively treats these important stakeholders as an after thought. night time entertainment is prohibited in much of the area. it divides and relocated it rather than treating as assets in the community. i have learned to come and respect how professionally the businesses operate and how passionately they care about the community and the impact they have on the community around them and furthermore i am impressed with the work of the entertainment commission, the police department and leaders in the industry such as c mac and work tirelessly to make entertainment safe and accessible in san francisco. our commission has the power to cite, permit with condition, fine and suspend licenses to problematic venues and provides a direct path for residents an
the integrity of the district. secondly we are talking about use of public finance to repay warrior's private financing of the pier substructure improvement. that may involve debt issuance over a 30-year period of time. we need to have a very detailed discussion about how that is secured, to ensure there are ongoing revenues to continue paying that debt. that is something we will discuss with director of public finance and others who work on finance in the city. i think jennifer has talked a lot about the project financing that we will address through the pro forma analysis and discuss what the city is obliged to repay and community benefits. how specifically is city through the term sheet with warriors establishing a way to pay for police, neighborhood cleanup and additional transit service. those have to be answered in the term sheet. after the term sheet is approved, it would be endorsed by the port commission and board of supervisors. it is non-binding, reflects intention of parties headed into environmental review. during the period of environmental review city staff would negotiate a mo
developing sensors that we could place around cities that would give us some analytics on how people move around cities and how vehicles drive around cities. so, currently we have 16 neighborhoods -- 18 neighborhoods covered in san francisco, and we get real-time data back that shows exactly how many people go by some of the busiest areas in san francisco. so, you can see here san francisco, on average total, i think we had 150 people cross our sensors on average for every sensor. in case you want to go into time density. so, we end up getting these really, really great visualizations of the busiest times and the least busiest times of people moving around san francisco. you want to go down into union square? you can see the data changes dramatically when we change the neighborhood. and just illustrates how different every neighborhood in san francisco really is. we're announcing today that we're providing some of this data to the city as a kind of public service to help the citizens here figure out how many people walk around their neighborhood. but mostly it's to help public service, li
of radio frequencies, radio technology, even before the planning we didn't know what they had. it took us several planning opportunities and meetings to flush through some of that information and one of the biggest take aways for us, as a city we're required to have a tactical interoperatable communications plan. it describes how you interoperate in an emergency or an event within the city as well as regional partners. we don't have that with military and i think that's one of the biggest take aways, we need to really flesh out a document so we have captured who our contacts are, what technology they are going to bring to the table and start that initial planning from the get-go. we also had some technical challenges with land mobile radio. you know, we have the coverage issues, but we were stationed at the san francisco police department command van, i had some very sharp people there who were able to work through a lot of those interoperatability issues so a huge thank you to the police department and also the fire department and sheriff's department were also there able to provide u
for any athletic fields and neighborhood parks, 831-5510. you can also write us. or walking in and say hello at old lock cabin, golden gate park. and of course you can find more information and reach us at sfrecpark.org. >> san francisco is home to some of the most innovative companies of the 21st century. this pioneering and forward looking spirit is alive in san francisco government as well. the new headquarters of the san francisco public utilities commission at a5 25 golden gate avenue is more than just a 13-story building and office ablation. instead, city leaders, departments and project managers join forces with local architectural firms ked to build one of the greatest office buildings in america. that's more than a building. that's a living system. ♪ ♪ when san francisco first bought this land in 1999, it was home to a state office building. >> this was an old eight-story brown building the state owned and the workers' comp people were in that building. it was an old dee correctvth it building for decades. when i was a member of the board of supervisors, all of
and at sfgtv we have our staff. madam clerk do you have the announcements for us today. >> please make sure to silent all cell phones and electronic devices and speaker cards should be submitted to the clerk. items acted on today will be on the board of supervisors agenda unless . >> stated. >> we will excuse the commissioner. will you call income one please. >> the sfo shuttle bus company at city and county of san francisco and provide services at san francisco international airport and through the airport commission. >> thank you for this item. we have kathy wieger from sfo. >> good morning. i am with san francisco international airport. the san francisco international airport is speaking your approval with sfo shuttle bus company to provide service for employees and passengers between the airport's terminals, long-term public parking lots and employee lots and garages for initial term of three years and seven moptds. the contract also has three two year options to extend . the proposed contract will provide management and operational services for shuttle buses at sfo between the pa
about a week-long event and actually constructed a building and this also helps us it restore capability to wherever we are responding to. this shows a lot of different response here. this is our urban search and rescue event that was part of the overall exercise. we had a lot of different partners that responded to this rubble pile. we had urban search and rescue, u.s. coast guard, and this provided an opportunity for our military to work with the federal and state partners there in learning how to interact with their agencies and also being able to learn some of the different capabilities that they have in using their equipment. we also had some medical partners there where they were able to locate and evacuate the medical patients and that also showed a great partnership. this is the health care association for hawaii and this is the part of the agency that helped us coordinate the medical response part of this. they were able to conduct a 50-bed disaster medical assistance team hospital on the island of oahu and this allowed the state of hawaii to be able to exercise the
be very important because of pre-war because china as well as the united states u.s. to lift the asia first and second strategy which has become a major issue. while most of the british try t down play that role and i think in retrospect, both sides had this validity and the argument, and by the time china had becom very important toward the end o 1943, 1944 the nature of the  had changed because the u.s. original strategy was to drive the japanese to the western pacific to the edge to go north and through the japan homeland. but by the end of 1943 to 44 particularly after the battle o the philippines. so the land route which was urgently planned by china have become much less significant. so that's why it is very mplex. >> professor why did you plan the attack in china in 1937? >> that is a long story. to make it short, both japan an china were military and economically in the 1930's and japan has a very different national psyche than the chinese. there are big, divide
that use cell? >> we have these lovely constructed platters. we make these wonderful powder bowls. they can have a lot of color. >> york also using your license. -- you are also using your license. >> this means that i can register with the city. this makes sure that our family participated in making all of these. >> this comes by licensed artists. the person selling it is the person that made it. there is nothing better than the people that made it. >> i would like you to meet michael johnson. he has been in the program for over 8 years. >> nice to me you. what inspired your photography? >> i am inspired everything that i see. the greatest thing about being a photographer is being able to show other people what i see. i have mostly worked in cuba and work that i shot here in san francisco. >> what is it about being a street artist that you particularly like? >> i liked it to the first day that i did it. i like talking to mentum people. talking about art or anything that comes to our minds. there is more visibility than i would see in any store front. this would cost us relatively very litt
of early elections. one of the world's biggest consumers of fuel may be self-relia self-reliant. u.s. us a makers churn out car after car but it seems americans will making more fuel to power them. >> that's light. industry analysts expect a major shift will take place in the near future. we're hearing the united states will become the world's largest oil producer in the next five years. the iea said u.s. oil output would surpass saudi arabia. commercial production has already begun. the agency says the u.s. will be nearly self-sufficient in energy by 2035. that's due to an expected surge in production of shale gas. a type of natural gas trapped in under ground rock. america relies on it for 20% of import needs. now let's get a check on the markets. the yen is losing ground slightly against the dollar and the euro. dollar/yen is changing hands at 79.57 and the euro/yen is quoted at 100.99 to 104. debt stricken greece could get bail out funds. share prices are rising slightly in tokyo. this morning the index stands at 8,695. that's up about two-tenths of a percent. the index fell six days
is not the case. most of us are carrying around smart phones which are far more effective at tracking our every move than clipper cards. a recently designed smart phone application allows the phone to scan the clipper card and transmit information. it can be used without the clipper card's user's knowledge or permission. people can protect themselves from this by storing their clipper cards in a bag or somewhere, where it would be difficult for someone else to place a smart phone within a few inches of the card thus perhaps getting that information. the resolution addresses this issue. with the resolution, and i have an amendment of the whole that i have passed on to the clerk, it actually includes amendments that have been proposed by the mtc, we definitely wanted to work with the mtc on their concerns about moving forward with the new resolution and so the new resolution reflects those proposed amendments and they include a way to determine what the minimum duration of time is that -- excuse me -- it will request that the mtc provide a minimum duration of time that they will maintain clip
used to -- there is a statement, saving my ass. [laughter] if there is a question i hope you do not look at it as a challenge. i think it is a feeling. there are quite a few events in the park. it is really about managing them and making sure that your outreach is good. i would like to work together, wherever you are. i want to thank our panelists. i hope that you will as well. [applause] i hope that that gave you some food for thought, the idea here about things that we will talk about in the breakouts. we have got some food and beverage out there. i know that we have drinks, cookies, even sandwiches. it should be in room a, one of our breakout sessions. take this opportunity to use the west -- the restaurant and find your own way. thank you. -- rest room and find your own way. thank you. >> san francisco is home to some of the most innovative companies of the 21st century. this pioneering and forward looking spirit is alive in san francisco government as well. the new headquarters of the san francisco public utilities commission at a5 25 golden gate avenue is more than just a
assessment. i'd like to actually -- first of all, i think it's really important for us in planning transportation to take that step back and do much more than just plan for one particular project. when so much is going on in the surrounding neighborhood, this idea of doing a transportation assessment was to get out ahead of what we know are three large projects that will be coming along pretty soon. we're working obviously with piers 30-32. we're aware of what is happening with mission rock. we'll be working with pier 70. it made sense for us at mta to make sure that as a stakeholder ourselves in ensuring good transportation and looking at pedestrian and bicycle and transit and traffic and parking that we also are as concerned about the quality that comes out of this. what we see is an opportunity here and i appreciate the chance to work and get ahead of this opportunity. so, the slides that i have on the powerpoint, i don't know if that's coming across -- thank you -- one of the first steps we want to do is step back and look at not just pier 30-32, but look at the bigger waterfro
the minimum of 10 dollars, or allow us to have a signposted, only cash. is up to us. we lose the business. you don't. in the people don't have a credit card, we lose the business. >> marcelo fonseca, followed by --[indiscernible] . >> good afternoon sir. >> good afternoon i want to talk again on the -- illegal operation that ms. hyoshi talk about. she talk about a lot of things i want to say. i want to urge you to go after them. they are big threat to our industry. if i listen to you mr. [indiscernible] i don't think you can look the other way. they are threatened this industry. if you don't do anything about it, this medallion treasure could become worthless. they are a major threat to the industry. they are everywhere. they do as they please. it is not fair that we have so many rules and regulations to comply with and they roam the streets as they please. please keep the pressure on them. and to the best you can so we can survive in this industry. thank you. >> chairman nolan: speaker please. >> -- [indiscernible] >> at the last meeting, item 11.7, approved by the board, unilateral ac
in and day out, not only built trust between us and the afghans but it gave them the ability to prg on a daily basis. so the other frustration was the coalition effort. there was a lot of people with great intentions willing to help shared by many different countries. the frustration was many different countries, there's many different ways of doing things. so we would be out there telling the afghans, this is how you conduct police operations, this is how we do police training, this is how you hold your weapon and engage the enemy, and then several weeks later another force would come in and not that it was necessarily wrong, but it was different. so from the afghan perspective, incredibly frustrating to understand where they are going and what they need to be doing and what is right and what is wrong. so in closing if someone were to ask me from 2010 to where we're at now, is there hope i would say, yes, there is. as we stand down our combat forces and shift to an advisory and a training role i think we're going to be able to take our lessons lerbed -- learned and ensure that
online to the extent that we can would be useful information. >> commissioner antonini. >> thank you. i would agree 100% with the request from commissioner borden because categorize things as market rate or affordable and we had instances a couple years ago where many of the market rate units were sold for less than have been the inclusionary amount that would have been charged under the ordinance, so it's important to really see real case situations and understand what you're really talking about in terms of the costs. a couple of other items in terms of the commission's secretary subcommittee search i am still waiting for a reply from hr in regards to the classification issue, and i am hopeful i will hear something on that issue within the next few days and i will follow up with that and see where we are. secondly i would strongly urge everyone who has not seen the movie "lincoln" to go see it. it's excellent. unlike many movies today there is dialogue and it's thought provoking and the period of time it deals with is one of the important, not just for the country but the s
you. i need it. that's all for us tonight. "ac 360" starts right now. >>> thanks, piers. 10:00 p.m. on the east coast. we begin the way anderson does every night. keeping them honest, not choosing sides or playing political favorites. plenty of that on the other cable news channels. we're interested in facts. they do exist, our goal is to show them to you honestly. tonight, the facts about taxes that a majority of americans established on election day, and an even big erma jort endorsed in recent polling most recently, a leading republican lawmaker on board. they agree with the president who wants to let taxes go up on income more than a quarter million dollars a year. mr. obama and the democrats get their way, doing a deal to raise just those rates would avoid the fiscal cliff, where all bush era tax cuts on all tack tax brackets expire at the ends of the year. the election, popular opinion and more give president obama a lot of clout right now. and you can agree or disagree with the president's policy. that's for you to decide. republican congressmen tom cole of oklahoma disagr
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